10 Things You Should Know About Job Relocation

10 Things You Should Know About Job Relocation

If you’re considering relocating for a new job, or even if you’re just beginning your search and want to be prepared, it’s a smart idea to really understand what it takes to relocate for a job. It is a high stakes decision, and most of us fear change. To take some of the unknowns out of the equation, here are 10 things you should know about job relocation to put yourself in a better position.

Research is essential to job relocation

Of course, you need to research your potential new employer—both the specific job and the company—but don’t neglect the rest of your homework. You need to know all about the new city, too. What’s the standard of living like there? How’s the weather? What’s the social scene like? If you have a family, where will they be going to work or school? The more questions you answer now, the less stressful your decision-making process will be.

 

The detailed description is essential

So, it sounds like the perfect job, right? Make sure you’ve got the long form description and understand each aspect of it. Meet at least twice with your potential boss and coworkers at the new office. Take a tour of the new place; make sure you come away with a strong sense of the organization’s culture and work environment.

 

Make a budget

If you haven’t created a budget yet—one that’s adjusted for your potential new city—you can’t even be sure the salary you’re being offered will work for you. Know the cost of living, how much housing runs, what you’ll need to invest in transportation, how much you will spend on furniture, and the details of your salary and other income before you make the jump. Remember, relocation is a big expense on its own; you can take some of the bite out of the process by renting furniture, which can really cut down your initial housing investment.

 

Nose around on social media

You can learn a lot about a company by checking it out on social media. Don’t stop with official company pages, either. See who you can find on LinkedIn or other social networks who works there. Then, move on to places like Glassdoor and message boards to see what people are saying about the company. If the company is hemorrhaging employees, you may want to keep looking.

 

Don’t forget to list pros and cons

It may sound simplistic, but a pros and cons list is an excellent visual device that can help you clear away mental fog and cut through the noise. Take your time so you can be sure you’re noting every positive and negative detail about the prospect of relocating. When you’re done, you should have a clear picture of what you’d be gaining—and what you’d be giving up.

 

Is there a moving allowance?

It’s a great idea to research moving allowances and other benefits, from the costs of the move itself to assistance selling your current home. Each company is different; some have extensive moving assistance for new employees, and some have little to nothing in the way of moving benefits. Find out what’s out there, and what matters most to you. This way you know what to ask about and know how to negotiate.

 

Know what matters to your family

Unless you’re single, you won’t be moving alone. Make sure you know what your family wants from your potential relocation—if they’re open to it at all. And even if you are single, be sure that your extended family is aware of your potential relocation. You don’t want to get to the last stage of negotiating your dream job only to learn of a major objection your entire family has with your departure. For the sake of your own stress level and sanity, know your family’s stance before you start the process.

 

Where will go you from there?

Whenever you are seeking new employment, consider this: does the new position offer you the kind of growth opportunities that can further your career? Once you’re there, will you be able to learn and do more with your work, or will you be in danger of stagnation? Asking your potential employer about growth opportunities isn’t impertinent; it’s a sign that you care about your career and are looking to further it with them.

 

Identify your support network

As you consider job relocation, think about whether you know anyone in your new city. If you don’t, what kind of support network will you have to rely upon? If you know you’ll be a little unsupported for a while until you sink in new roots, will that work out for you and your family? Make sure you know.

 

Trust your gut

Humans develop intuition because it helps us survive, so trust your gut. If you just have a bad feeling about a job or a move, recognize that you are simply not comfortable with it. If, on the other hand, you have that palpable sense of excitement thinking about it, your intuition is giving you a green light. Consider following your gut instincts.

 

The bottom line

Moving to a totally new place for a job is a deeply personal decision, and it’s a little different for everyone. Fortunately, there are some common themes that tie these decisions together for all of us. There are also some things you can do to save money and make relocation easier—and renting furniture from Fashion Furniture is definitely one of them. Check in with yourself about these ten things you should know about job relocation, and you’ll be well-prepared to make your big decision.

1 reply
  1. Jessi
    Jessi says:

    Job relocation is sure to be a tough decision. For me, I was worried about how to move all of my stuff! I was lucky to find furnishr because they helped me move all the big stuff so I didn’t even have to think twice about it! They were super easy and extremely helpful!

    Reply

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